Coat Muslin, and a Question

First of all, for those of you who also subscribe to BWOF, let me just say I really feel like they are phoning it in in the March issue.  I think a number of those patterns actually appeared in the September issue (like the skirt with sewed-down pleats).  And the things that are new are terrible.  Who wants this dress?

bwof_ugly1

Why is it made of two kinds of fabric?  They actually have two versions of this, and the other is much worse.  Anyway, just a digression.

Since DH was at a work thing last night, I have finished a muslin of the coat.  In contrast to some  (much more talented) people who actually make muslins which are much nicer than my final product, this coat is a true muslin, made out of muslin.  It only has one sleeve, and only one side with a pocket, etc.  At the moment, this looks like a flasher coat.  I think it’s something about the color, and the length.  But I really like it, and am looking forward to making it up in fabric.

coat_muslin

 

This actually came together pretty easily, except for the collar, which I think is not large enough (either tall enough or long enough).  Witness this: coat_muslin-003 which is the collar at the moment; it’s supposed to be flush.  Oops.  I’m off by about 1.25 inches.  But relative to the jacket I made last, this is a cinch.  The pockets are in the seam, and very easy to put together. 

The main barrier to moving forward on this (other than I want to make up a quick knit shirt as a break), is I dont know how to interface it.  I have at least three kinds of interfacing: pretty light, less light, and very stiff.  The fashion fabric is a fairly heavy brushed flannel.  What type of interfacing should I use in different parts?  Should I interface everything?  Or just the front and collar part, as in a regular jacket?  Maybe lighter interfacing on the entire thing?  Advice much appreciated…

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4 Comments »

  1. LOL @ flasher coat! Looking good so far. I am new to sewing, but it looks like you’re moving in the right direction. I read your review on PR. Don’t let this spring-like weather fool you–we do get snow in April, lol!

  2. inkstain said

    I too was appalled by the sack dress in the Burda March issue. Then I went to a shop Vero Moda and spotted a true grey cotton sack, just a rectangle with a V-neck hole for the head. For this they were charging a lot of money! Apparently somebody in Europe sent a model down the runway in a potato sack and Burda felt obliged to give us this “spring look” option, knowing sacks would fill the windows in our Continental boutiques. I even now have to give Burda credit for adding the drawstring and trying to add interest by doing it in a knit/satin combo.
    I’ve noticed that Burda is heavily influenced, not only by Vero Moda but also the Promod line out of Paris. This makes them fashion forward, to a degree that Vogue can’t claim, but sometimes, well, just dumb.

  3. Jenna said

    I mean, the sack doesn’t even fit the model. It’s a sack, how hard would that be?

  4. craftyprofessor said

    Inkstain: yes, I think this is a reasonable view of how Burda gets their ideas. And I do very much like the concept of this as a fancy reinterpretation of a potato sack!

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